Aroma-Qi Therapy – Teleseminar, December 17, 2014

AROMA-QI THERAPY: Ancient Chinese Five Element Energetics Expressed In Aromatic Blending

 

with Terese M. Miller DOM, CA, MFAterese-miller

 

Join Terese on the teleseminar to learn how Oriental Medicine can inform us in our energetic view of essential oils, it is important to have an overview of the two main theories that exist today in practice. Acupuncturists and Eastern Herbalists operate using either Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), Taoist Five Element Theory or a combination of both.

Tune in for a unique perspective on questions you may have about:

  • What are the main differences between TCM and Ancient Taoist Five Phase energetic theories?
  • What is the origin of The Heavenly Stems (five elements)?
  • Does each element contain correspondences to nature and the nature of the human body, mind and spirit?
  • Do we all have a unique constitutional element(s)?
  • What can I do if I am out of balance?
  • How do the five phases relate to specific essential oils?
  • What is Aroma-QI therapy?
  • Who can use this Aroma-Qi therapy?
  • What does Taoism have to do with it?

 

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My First Blend, My Sickness, and My Fun

fai-chanby Fai Chan, Aromatherapist

 

I keep a journal of the blends that I made on every occasion that involves aromatherapy. The case study is about the first blend that I made for myself in relieving my sickness. It turned out to be a great success. I discovered a protocol I keep using in healing.

 

November 17, 2013
I caught cold yesterday. I realized that my immune system was weak. When I felt the headache in the evening, I used tea tree oil to massage my head and I felt better.

 

When I woke up next morning, I could not do anything as my head ached and I had a mild fever. Therefore, I took a delicious breakfast with a glass of strawberry milk & some biscuits. I felt a lot better after a good meal. A delicious meal can help speed up the healing process.

 

Today, I take my first step to try blending. It’s really fun. It requires knowledge and creativity.

My blend is as follows:
1 drop of lavender (Lavandula angustifolia)
1 drop of geranium (Pelargonium roseum x asperum)
2 drops of ginger (Zingiber officinale)
1 tsp (5ml) of olive oil

 

It is relaxing, comforting, and stimulating. The hot ginger can help to expel the surface wind cold, while lavender and geranium calmed my heated organs. It smells great, not too intense. The mild fragrance is very well suited to those who are sick.

 

I then use the mixture to massage my chest, the back of the neck, my ears, my nose tip, the area between the nose and mouth, and abdominal area.

 

This blend works well to calm the menstrual pain or PMS too. After the applications, I took a cup of lemon with salt water. It is so soothing. I have never thought that being sick can be an enjoyment. If I was not sick, I do not know when I will have my first blend. This is my first product. This blend helps one to sleep well when one is sick.

 

November 18, 2013

I still experienced some spillover effect of the wind cold today. As the symptoms had almost gone, I blended another oil which is more fragrant. It was because I could take more fragrance now.

 

My blend is as follows:

1 drop of lavender (Lavandula angustifolia)
1 drop of Jasmine absolute (Jasminum grandiflorum)
1 drops of sandalwood (Santalum album )
3 drops of lemon (Citrus limon)
1tsp (5ml) of olive oil

 

I used the blend to massage back of the neck, shoulder, temples, nose tip, area between the nose and the mouth, my shoulders, chest and upper back area.

 

It is relaxing and astringent — it lessens the mucus. This blend is very relaxing and will cause drowsiness. After falling asleep, I feel much energetic now.

 

Conclusion: The two blends that I made were not targeting at healing my fever or cold, but making me more relaxing to fall asleep. When I am in deep sleep, my body can heal quickly. In my own philosophy, I prefer my body to do most of the work in the healing process, instead of relying on “outside help”. This experience reaffirms my belief on that, and it really works well. Although I ate things that were not 100% natural, the improvement in my mood helped me to recover in a speedy way.

 

Fai’s Bio:The owner of Deli Aroma LLC, Fai, got her clinical & esthetic aromatherapy certificates from Academy of Natural Health Sciences. She is now furthering her study with Aromahead Institute. She founded Deli Aroma in 2014, providing holistic approach to alleviate her clients’ aliments. She is a Professional Member with NAHA, and AIA.

Email: deliaroma8@gmail.com

Enhance Your Aromatherapy Practice – Teleseminar Oct 15, 2014

Enhancing your Aromatherapy Practice with Swiss Reflex Therapyloracanteles-web2

 

Swiss Reflex Therapy (SRT) is the perfect enhancement specific to aromatherapy practitioners by offering additional value to the therapeutic relationship between you and your client. As aromatherapists we are not legally allowed to diagnose a client, however Swiss Reflex Therapy provides a tool to help you assess your clients needs, as well as provide treatment and encourage your client to be more proactive in their own healing. Created by world-renown aromatherapist and reflexologist Shirley Price in the 1980's, SRT is practiced in many parts of the world with great success. Tune in to learn how you can set your practice apart from others.

 

In this presentation, Lora will share with you how you can enhance your aromatherapy practice with this useful tool and set yourself apart from other practitioners. Massage and reflexology, require the practitioner to undertake additional year or two of education and requires licensure. SRT can be learned in a weekend and can be performed within the exemption of massage and reflexology laws. Swiss Reflex Therapy offers the practitioner a diagnostic tool to assess a clients health needs, enhances the therapeutic relationship, provides treatment and encourages your client to be more proactive in their own care. Are you ready to take your practice to the next level?

Colorado Law Helps Aromatherapists

With incredible determination a small Colorado group of dedicated alternative healthcare professionals convinced the Colorado legislators to pass a law so they can provide alternative healthcare.day-bev

 

Senate Bill 13-215, The Colorado Natural Health Consumer Protection Act supports alternative health care professionals, a "safe harbor health freedom bill."

 

This act is a challenge to unnecessary state regulation. SB 13-215 allows alternative medicine without conflict within the established medical community.

Pursuant to the introduction of SB 13-215, a 2009 survey showed that over 35% of the U.S. population spends over 33 billion dollars a year on alternative and complimentary medicine and procedures. In Colorado, more than a million and a half people obtain health care services outside the establishment.

From Gold Rush days to modern times, Colorado meets the challenge of keeping up with change. What's happening in your state? In your country? Let us know. We're ready to support you with information. Just ask! Download "The Act"

Teleseminar – July 16, 2014

The Sensual Kitchen with Kris WredeKris_photo-#1-h

 

Kris Wrede has been cooking up a storm for way longer that she wants to share or that can she remember! She has culinary roots from her wonderful Mama & Grandma. Some of the stupendously yummy essential oil based recipes I will share in the teleseminar include Passion Sun Tea and Melon Ginger chilled soup. Tune in to hear all the secrets!

 

The use of plant and flower essences for therapy of mind and body and spirit were once considered the exclusive provenance of Egyptian Priests. Now you can unlock this ancient knowledge with Kris Wrede, Aromatic Alchemist and Natural Perfumer. Kris’s specialties include perfumery, skin care and essential oil cooking.

 

Her classroom approach stems from her extensive research into the mystical rituals of ancient cultures, her philosophy of perfume as medicine, and the miraculous healing energy apparent in the art of essential oil use. Her knowledge of essential oils is enhanced by a passion for their history. Allow Kris to share her wisdom with you, let her lead you through the aromatic world and imagine the possibilities it can play in your life. Learn more about teleseminars...

Manuka Oil

by Austine McCarthy, RN

July 2014

mccarthy-7-14

Manuka is a very interesting member of the Myrtaceae family, Manuka Leptospermum scoparium. Coming from the same family are Australia's Tea Tree (Melaleuca alternifolia), Fragonia (Agonia fragrans), Eucalyptus (Eucalyptus radiata and globulus) and Kunzea (Kunzea ambigua). Growing uncultivated on unfarmable land in New Zealand, it is thought that perhaps the stress of the growing conditions contribute to Manuka's important attributes.

 

Essential oil of Manuka is steam distilled from the leaves and small stems that are gathered after the flowering season is complete. The flowering season is sacred because bees gather nectar to produce the valuable Manuka honey crop.

 

The essential oil has a yellowish/ brown color, a sharp, earthy odor. Probably not a fragrance that will make the best perfume for date night.

 

Much of the research is related to the benefits of the Manuka honey, most notably in the wound care arena. Medical grade honey is incorporated into dressings and topicals used to heal chronic wounds such as vascular and diabetic ulcers and decubitus ulcers (bed sores).  Read more... 

Sebaceous Cyst Treatment

by Stefania Borrelli, Aromatherapist, Reflexologiststefania-borrelli
June 2014

About nine years ago I noticed a little harmless lump of fat grow on my right shoulder and was told that was a sebaceous cyst and that I could get it removed with a simple surgical procedure if it was painful or would become bigger. Over the years, it grew to a sizable lump. 

 

In November 2010 I put on some hot Ricinus communis (Castor) oil pack for few minutes to help to break down any inflammation and promote lymphatic waste removal. Also, I prepared the following balm. In a 20 ml carrier oil blend - Ricinus communis (Castor) oil, Nigella sativa (Blackseed) oil, Oenothera biennis (Evening Primerose) oil, Calendula officinalis (Calendula) oil, Azadirachta indica (Neem) oil - I added a 5% dilution of Melaleuca alternifolia (Tea Tree) leaf oil and Lavandula angustifolia (Lavender) oil. In the balm I also included 5 gr. of Leptospermum scoparium (Manuka) honey.  Read more...

Teleseminar – May 21, 2014

Shining Our Light with Essential Oils - Community Outreach

with Elizabeth Joneselizabeth-jones

 

Elizabeth Jones is a pioneer, leading educator, healer, formulator, and advocate of using therapeutic quality essential oils for integrative medicine. She has an extensive educational background from Skidmore College, University of California, Berkeley, and the California School of Herbal Studies. In 1997, she founded the College of Botanical Healing Arts in Santa Cruz, California, and has served as director and primary instructor since then. Learn about teleseminars...

Rosemary Essential Oil ~ Powerful, Penetrating and Rising

By Marc J, Gian, L.Ac., LMT

 

Rosemary: Cardinal Oil for Upward Direction   marcsheadshot-crop

There are 4 major directions when working on clients: Upward and Outward corresponding to Yang energy (as with Rosemary and Lavender), Inward and Downward- correlating to Yin (as with Myrrh and Spikenard)

 

To understand the directionality of Essential Oils, it is important to know the temperature and the depth that oils will penetrate into the body — or in terms of Traditional Chinese Medicine, the Wei, Ying or Yuan levels. It is also important to understand how and where the plants from which the oils are obtained grow. Understanding these basics help us to accurately predict and anticipate the desired effect. As this is the first blog in a series, we will begin with the Upward direction.  Read more ...