Aromatic Medicine: Internal Dosing of Essential Oils

Article by Amy Kreydin

 

  botanical medicine capsule  

 

If aromatherapy is a frequently misunderstood profession then the specialization of aromatic medicine is so out there we could be discussing xenobotany here. But we're not talking about plant life on other planets, this is a unique branch of botanical medicine that employs volatile aromatic plant extracts in internal dose forms.

 

Twenty years ago I began studying botanical medicine in high mountain meadows, birthing rooms, greenhouses, gardens, and dining rooms in Northern New Mexico. Six years ago I studied clinical aromatherapy in a classroom at Boston Medical Center. Last year I began studying aromatic medicine at the Heal Center. It was an International effort coordinated by South African Roz Zollinger, Brit Gabriel Mojay, and led by Aussie Mark Webb. It was amazing and I've loved how it has taken my practice and education to another level. 🙂   Continue reading

A 5 Element Approach to Understanding Essential Oils: The Wood Element

Article by Marc J. Gian, L. Ac, LMT

 

5 Elements

 

There are as many ways to classify Essential Oils as there are to use them. As we use essential oils for "holistic aromatherapy" we need to become clear on what holistic means. All too often, the term holistic is thrown around for the use of treating symptoms without allopathic medicine. However, to accurately be holistic practitioners the inclusion of the emotional/mental aspect of our client is paramount. The philosophy of the 5 Elements is one system that can lead to sincere holistic treatment.

 

The 5 Elements or Wu Xing is a leading paradigm used in Chinese medicine and is a solution for the aromatherapist eager to understand the root of illness. The 5 Elements are used to describe many of the phenomena of the natural world including the human condition. Each element gives birth to another and then cycles back again, just like the seasons. Continue reading

AIA Becomes “Contributing Producer” for Aromatherapy Documentary – Uncommon Scents

Uncommon Scents Thanks AIA

 

The world of aromatherapy is a complex one. There are everything from home users who use essential oils through oral traditions, people who self-study, and others that receive formal training to understand the chemical makeup and actions of essential oils. Aromatherapy pioneers such as Robert Tisserand, Sylla Shepherd-Hanger, Jeanne Rose, Colleen Dodt, and Marge Clark have been studying the art and science of aromatherapy for 30-40+ years. Millions are just beginning to study aromatherapy.

 

Social media sites such as Facebook, Pinterest, and Instagram have made the sharing of information about essential oils easier than ever. Aromatherapy pioneers generously contribute to the discussion and provide valuable insight.

 

While there is a vast amount of information about aromatherapy available online, it is not all reliable, and in many cases is misleading, incorrect, or dangerous. This range of information has set up a divide in the aromatherapy community and caused finger-pointing and leaves many scratching their heads to find a way to bring the aromatherapy community together to move forward united with a common goal of sharing sound information to make responsible aromatherapy available to as many as possible. Continue reading

Visiting the home of Fragonia™

by Priscilla Fouracres

 

I recently had the privilege of visiting the only place in the world where Fragonia™ (Agonis fragrans), is grown and produced into essential oil. The 46-hectare property (114 acres), owned and operated by John and Peta Day, is about two hours from Perth, the capital city of Western Australia.

John and Peta Day in a field of Agonis fragrans (Photo courtesy of the Paperbark Co.)

John and Peta Day in a field of Agonis fragrans (Photo courtesy of the Paperbark Co.)

 

The 'farm', as the Days call it, has a sense of serenity that emanates from the well-cared for and highly-loved piece of land they began developing 15 years ago.

 

A mud-map is required to find the farm and even then it is easy to drive past the unassuming property in a low-lying marshland where paperbark trees, a common name for some species of Melaleucas from the Myrtaceae family1, grow naturally. Continue reading

Beyond Aromatherapy Teleseminar, December 16, 2015

Beyond Aromatherapy: Expand Your Practice

with Sara Jo Holmes BS RA LMT NCTMB

sara-holmes-tree-largeI teach Complementary Therapies in Healthcare for College Students at Parkland College in Champaign, IL and have now done so for 10 years. Aromatherapy opened the door to my current career and although it was a difficult path new opportunities presented themselves and I embraced them! My horizons have broadened and I have learned much from the journey. Since my aromatherapy beginnings, I have added massage therapy, meditation, energy work (Reiki and Chakra balancing), herbal therapy, and many other forms of CAM to my private practice, my classes and my life. I will share with you how I prepared and expanded my practice, increased my income and help you do the same. I hope this presentation will encourage you to explore the other health therapies that make perfect partners to aromatherapy and can open new doors for yourself and your business.  Learn more...

Benefits of Essential Oils on the Skin, Teleseminar, Nov 18, 2015

Benefits of Essential of Essential Oils on the Skin 
with Maria-Dolores Trujillo, CTN, CNHP, CNC, CA, Licensed Esthetician

 

trujillo-md-09-15cropSkin Reveals the Internal Condition of the Body.
A Healthy Skin is a Reflection of a Healthy Body.
When the skin shows symptoms of acne, eczema, shingles, or aging, among others, the many healing benefits of essential oils are an aid to address redness, inflammation, infection, itchiness, and even to encourage rejuvenation. 

 

Meet Maria-Dolores Trujillo
Maria Dolores Trujillo is a Board Certified Traditional Naturopath, a Certified Aromatherapist specialized in the clinical modality, a Licensed Esthetician, Certified Natural Health Professional, Certified Nutritional Consultant, and Educator, She is also the founder of Aromatherapy Institute, Inc., and lavanda® Aromatherapy/Botanical Products. Learn more...

ACHS Takeaways from the AIA International Aromatherapy Conference

ACHS

The American College of Healthcare Sciences, Conference Sponsor, shares their Blog with AIA.

 

Science and healthcare is a dynamic, fast-paced industry. When it comes to essential oils and aromatherapy, the information is constantly evolving and changing as more research is done to advance our collective knowledge.

 

So how do you stay on top of the developments in this high-speed industry? Attend conferences where experts in your field share their latest research and findings.

 

Earlier this month, the Alliance of International Aromatherapists brought together nearly 150 aromatherapists for their 2015 Conference and Expo. The 21 expert sessions covered topics such s aromatherapy myths, FDA regulations, aromatherapy in hospital settings, and much more. It was a fantastic assembling of the aromatic community.

 

If you didn’t make it, don’t stress! A few ACHS students (check out their video below!) and I made sure to write down our top takeaways from the expert sessions: Read more...

 

Use of Essential Oils with Traditional Chinese Medicine

fai-chan-2By Fai Chan (CMAIA) and Marc J. Gian, L. Ac, LMT

 

The use of essential oils based on Chinese medicine has proven to be an exceptional modality in gaining maximum results with clients.  This ancient healing system naturally adopts the use of essential oils.

 

This case study will give the reader an overview of how to work with the Spleen and Stomach (Earth Element).

 

Two of the major pathogenic factors in Chinese medicine are Damp and Cold. These influences cause stagnation of Qi. In short, when there is stagnant qi the energy does not flow properly and the body will experience signs and symptoms that mirror this.  

 

conf-gian

According to Chinese medicine a primary function of the Earth element (Spleen and Stomach) is to transform and transport postnatal qi.  Our postnatal qi is associated with diet, which includes what we absorb from our environment. (Gian 2015) (1)  TCM physiology states, that the Spleen ascends the pure postnatal qi and the stomach descends the impure. So, if the Qi is deficient the Spleen will not be able to do its proper job and this causes stagnation.  A cardinal sign of Spleen Qi Deficiency and Stagnation is flatulence.  This was the case with one of my clients, a 35 year old woman. Read more...

 

 

4 Ways to Boost Your Business NOW!

Teleseminar - April 15, 2015 

 

With Many Savard-Alston, Business Development Coach for Aromatherapists, Certified Clinical Aromatherapistconf-savard-alston

 

It can be overwhelming going through the many ways to potentially boost your business. Every expert, friend, and family member has advice for you. What if you had 4 ways that work? What if you chose just 1 of those 4 ways to build your business now? You don’t want to miss this call.

 

This seminar will pinpoint 4 ways that you can boost your business now and see results by the end of the summer if you stick with them.

Learn more...

When Ginger does not help ——

The effect of Frankincense (Bowswellia frereana) in sobering and healing nauseachan-2

by Fai Chan, Aromatherapist

 

Ginger (Zingiber officinale) is renowned and widely praised for its ability to reduce motion sickness or nausea. There was a short period of time that I experienced nausea whenever someone gave me a ride. To help reduce the symptom, I usually brought Ginger essential oil mixed with jojoba oil to massage. I also put 1 drop of Ginger essential oil onto the tissue to inhale. However, I was not happy with the result.

 

To enhance the effect of Ginger essential oil, I made a salve with Ginger and Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) essential oils to massage when I was traveling. The blend had the following components:

0.25 oz Beeswax
1 oz Jojoba Wax
7 drops of Ginger
5 drops of Lavender

 

Together with the sedative or calming effect of Lavender on the central nervous system, the warm and spicy aroma of Ginger should be able to enhance the therapeutic properties in reducing motion sickness and nausea.  

 

When I first applied it, the smell is sweet and soothing that the salve improved the nausea but only temporarily. Repeated application did not help.

 

By chance I came across the oil named Frankincense (Boswellia frereana). I first encountered the oil when I attended a dinner, had some wine, and got half drunk.
After that dinner I applied Frankincense (Boswellia frereana) oil (1/4 tsp olive oil, 1 drop of essential oil) every 15 minutes twice on my forehead, temples, tip of the nose, area between the mouth and the nose, back of the neck, and shoulders; I also drank some hot green tea. I sobered up.

 

Thus, whenever I got motion sickness or nausea, I applied Frankincense [1/4 tsp olive oil, and 1 drop of essential oil] on the temples, back of the neck, and shoulders (apply several times or as necessary when needed). It worked great. The motion sickness or nausea went away after several applications and no longer bothered me.

 

Frankincense can also clear the mind and elevate the spirit. It keeps your spirit strong, focused, and positive. I used to take a nap after my breakfast, but as of today (Dec 15, 2014) I do not have to. Since I had back acne, and I was using frankincense to clear them with carrier oil. The whole process of application was rejuvenating. The inhalation of frankincense made me feel great and energetic about myself. As frankincense can achieve this objective, I suspect the application of it can relieve symptoms of mental illness. More research is needed to validate the claim.

 

The information or research about Boswellia frereana is very limited.  Known as the King of Frankincense, Boswellia frereana is usually imported from Somalia.  The therapeutic properties of Boswellia frereana are anti-inflammatory, uplifting, revitalizing, and centering.  It is also used for joint health. 

 

According to Stillpoint Aromatics (2014), Boswellia frereana is composed mainly of the chemistry of alpha thuyene, delta sabinene and para cymene – they are related to monoterpenes.  It also carries the characteristics of monoterpenes such as antiviral, antibacterial, analgesic, and so on.  Because of a high content of alpha thuyene, the aroma of Boswellia frereana is more pungent. 

 

People usually equate Boswellia frereana with Boswellia carterii.  From my experience, the latter is milder and more calming.  The invigorating effect of the former can make us stay awake all the night.

 

I think there are more benefits to Boswellia frereana.  More research is needed on its clinical application. 

 

References:

Boswellness. 2014. Retrieved from http://www.boswellness.com/sites/default/files/pdfs/Boswellness%20Frereana%20EO%20product%20sheet.pdf

Stillpoint Aromatics. 2014. Retrieved from http://www.stillpointaromatics.com/frankincense-frereana-Boswellia-frereana-essential-oil-aromatherapy?keyword=frankincense

Therapeutic properties mentioned above are from Aromahead Online Classes.

 

Bio: Bio: Fai Chan is the founder of Deli Aroma LLC. She received her certification from Academy Natural Health Sciences. She is now pursuing Advanced Graduate Certification online with Andrea Butje at Aromahead Institute. She is a Professional Member with NAHA and AIA. In addition, she has written articles for Lab Aroma, AIA, Aromatherapy Today (which will get published in the April edition), and Aromatherapy Thymes (which will get published in the Spring edition).
Email: deliaroma8@gmail.com