Essential Oils – Alliance of International Aromatherapists http://www.alliance-aromatherapists.org Fri, 24 Jun 2016 22:00:24 +0000 en-US hourly 1 The Bugs of Summer http://www.alliance-aromatherapists.org/the-bugs-of-summer/ Tue, 14 Jun 2016 23:01:36 +0000 http://www.alliance-aromatherapists.org/?p=6843 Continue reading ]]> Bugs of Summer

 

Bug season is upon us and that means it’s time for aromatherapy bug spray blends. Although all essential oils will repel some insects, there are a few that are more commonly used for the summer pests that many deal with such as mosquitoes, black flies, and ticks.

 

You may need to experiment to find out what works for your local bugs. Here are some essential oils classically used to deter the tiny biters…

 

  • Citronella (Cymbopogon winterianus)
  • Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia)
  • Cedarwood (Cedrus atlantica, Juniperus virginiana, Cedrus deodora, or Juniperus mexicana)
  • Patchouli (Pogostemon cablin)
  • Spikenard (Nardostachys jatamansi)
  • Geranium Bourbon (Pelargonium graveolens)
  • Lemon Eucalyptus (Eucalyptus citriodora)
  • Lemon Tea Tree (Leptospermun petersonii)
  • Catnip (Nepeta cataria)

 

Try different combinations of these oils and experiment by adding some of your own.

 

Use distilled water with a touch of alcohol, witch hazel, or liquid Castile soap and blend at up to 2% (1% for kids, using kid-safe oils, of course). Hydrosols also make an excellent base and contribute to repelling bugs. Peppermint hydrosol smells especially good when combined with patchouli essential oil.

 

Try This:

 

Mix catnip essential oil into neem carrier oil and spray on plants and trees. The neem sticks to the plants and trees and keeps mosquitoes away. Use one tablespoon (30ml) neem per one gallon of water, shake well and spray (catnip eo is optional). Be sure to respray after it rains.

 

Suggested Proportions:

 

  • 1 Tbsp Neem oil ( Azadirachta indica)
  • 50 drops Catnip (Nepeta cataria)
  • 1 gallon Water

 

Bonus Tip:

 

Leave out Lemongrass as it attracts bees. Beekeepers use lemongrass oil to swarm bees to a new hive (click below to watch video):

 

Click to watch bee video

 

 

Use common sense beyond aromatherapy:

 

Check your property for potential breeding grounds for mosquitos. Empty anything that has standing water such as buckets and old tires to be sure that they do not nest near your home. Wear protective clothing and tuck pant legs into socks when walking through high grass.

 

Remember to write down your recipes as you make them so the winning one can be replicated! Share you recipes with us on the AIA Facebook page.

 

Emily Carpenter

Emily Carpenter is a Certified Aromatherapist, herbalist, and Reiki practitioner who also studies homeopathy. She blogs about her experiences on www.marvymoms.com.

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A 5 Element Approach to Understanding Essential Oils: The Wood Element http://www.alliance-aromatherapists.org/a-5-element-approach-to-understanding-essential-oils-the-wood-element/ Mon, 18 Apr 2016 19:21:19 +0000 http://www.alliance-aromatherapists.org/?p=6575 Continue reading ]]> Article by Marc J. Gian, L. Ac, LMT

 

5 Elements

 

There are as many ways to classify Essential Oils as there are to use them. As we use essential oils for “holistic aromatherapy” we need to become clear on what holistic means. All too often, the term holistic is thrown around for the use of treating symptoms without allopathic medicine. However, to accurately be holistic practitioners the inclusion of the emotional/mental aspect of our client is paramount. The philosophy of the 5 Elements is one system that can lead to sincere holistic treatment.

 

The 5 Elements or Wu Xing is a leading paradigm used in Chinese medicine and is a solution for the aromatherapist eager to understand the root of illness. The 5 Elements are used to describe many of the phenomena of the natural world including the human condition. Each element gives birth to another and then cycles back again, just like the seasons.

 

Let’s take a look a look at the basics of the 5 Elements:

 

5 Element Chart

 

We are all born with a predominance of one or two elements that make up our being. During certain situations and times of life one elemental trait will dominate. This can be equated to an essential oil blend. When blending, quantity and function/personality of essential oil determines dominance of one oil over the other.

 

As the seasons cycle towards spring, it suites that this article focus on correlating the Wood Element and Aromatherapy/Essential Oils. The organs that are associated with the Wood Element are the Liver and Gall Bladder. The mother of the Wood Element is the Water Element, the Wood Element gives rise to the Fire Element.

 

The Water Element is associated with the winter time and dormancy. The Water Element can be seen as those aspects of our lives that have not been experienced or have brought into the world. Quite often, this can be the expression of our emotions, an idea that has been in the works or the deepest purpose in life.

 

Naturally, in order to emerge from inactivity (Winter) to a state of renewal (Spring) and then to full expression (Fire) the directionality of energy needs to be in an upward and outward direction. In Chinese medicinal terms, this correlates to the function of Promoting the Movement of Qi. This function helps to maintain the movement of energy in our being and move dormant/suppressed Qi. For the purposes of this writing and to comprehend our energetic cycles we need to be clear that upward and outward direction or promoting the movement of Qi is used in all seasons, it is dependent on what is happening to with the individual.

 

From the above we can correlate that movement forward is associated with the Wood Element. As a matter of fact, symptoms associated with “sciatica” or “piriformis” and other forms of muscle tightness are associated with the Wood Element. Quite often, the emotional cause of pain in this area is a result of either not moving forward in life or suppressing our emotions or the direction we want to go. The Wood Element is associated with direction in life and the expression of anger. If our anger or direction in life does not progress outward it gets suppressed and moves downward. This is the opposite direction of spring.

 

This perverse flow on Liver Qi is an actual cause of physical pain and may also be a contributor to the western medical diagnosis of depression. Therefore, from the basics we already know, the proper essential oils to use would be those that have the function to Promote the Movement of Qi to unblock this dormancy (Winter). Essential Oils that are classified for the Wood Element and have this function include: Rosemary, Lemongrass, and Lavender angustifolia.

 

All of the above oils are associated with moving stagnant Qi yet do so in different ways. Naturally, when we experience irritation and frustration, our muscle tense. The Liver controls the sinews. Lemongrass the “tendinomuscular oil” is key in Promoting the Movement of Qi in the hips, legs and ankles. Consequently, Lemongrass is an excellent choice for muscle tenderness due to emotional suppression, i.e sciatica pain/piriormis syndrome. This warming oil has the ability to move stagnation in the muscle layer especially in the hips and legs. Treating physical pain is often the first step in the freedom from emotional stagnation.

 

Rosemary is commonly used with Lemongrass for the above symptoms. Yet, its spring like nature can also be seen in its ability to strengthen our digestive system. Our digestive system (Earth Element) becomes deficient for many reasons including diet and emotional experience. A common diagnosis is what is called Wood (Liver) Overacting on Earth (Spleen) Common symptoms of Wood Overacting on Earth include; irritability, bloating, alternating diarrhea and constipation and fatigue. In addition to being associated with the Wood Element it also has an affinity with the Earth Element. This dual association makes Rosemary the premier essential oil for treating this condition.The two functions that Rosemary has to treat this are Promoting the Movement of QI Upwards (the expression of self) and Raising the Spleen Qi.

 

The rising nature of Wood engenders the Fire Element (Heart and Small Intestine. Lavender is an oil that has an affinity with both the Wood and Fire Element. Similar to Lemongrass and Rosemary, Lavender promotes the Movement of Qi. However, Lemongrass and Rosemary are both warming in nature, while Lavender is cool and is distilled from a flower. As it is a flower, it calms with a cooler, softer and gentler quality. Lavender is a principal oil to be used when there are emotional issues of the Fire Element, such as anxiety, restlessness and nostalgia.

 

The system of the 5 Element deepens the understanding of essential oils and provides a framework to connect emotions and physicality. When practitioners start to use this structure they will observe the whole person and be able to treat in deeper and more efficient manner.

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Benefits of Essential Oils on the Skin, Teleseminar, Nov 18, 2015 http://www.alliance-aromatherapists.org/benefits-of-essential-oils-on-the-skin-teleseminar-nov-18-2015/ Sat, 31 Oct 2015 11:52:41 +0000 http://www.alliance-aromatherapists.org/?p=6270 Continue reading ]]> Benefits of Essential of Essential Oils on the Skin 
with Maria-Dolores Trujillo, CTN, CNHP, CNC, CA, Licensed Esthetician

 

trujillo-md-09-15cropSkin Reveals the Internal Condition of the Body.
A Healthy Skin is a Reflection of a Healthy Body.
When the skin shows symptoms of acne, eczema, shingles, or aging, among others, the many healing benefits of essential oils are an aid to address redness, inflammation, infection, itchiness, and even to encourage rejuvenation. 

 

Meet Maria-Dolores Trujillo
Maria Dolores Trujillo is a Board Certified Traditional Naturopath, a Certified Aromatherapist specialized in the clinical modality, a Licensed Esthetician, Certified Natural Health Professional, Certified Nutritional Consultant, and Educator, She is also the founder of Aromatherapy Institute, Inc., and lavanda® Aromatherapy/Botanical Products. Learn more…

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ACHS Takeaways from the AIA International Aromatherapy Conference http://www.alliance-aromatherapists.org/achs-takeaways-from-the-aia-international-aromatherapy-conference/ Wed, 07 Oct 2015 11:23:42 +0000 http://www.alliance-aromatherapists.org/?p=6197 Continue reading ]]> ACHS

The American College of Healthcare Sciences, Conference Sponsor, shares their Blog with AIA.

 

Science and healthcare is a dynamic, fast-paced industry. When it comes to essential oils and aromatherapy, the information is constantly evolving and changing as more research is done to advance our collective knowledge.

 

So how do you stay on top of the developments in this high-speed industry? Attend conferences where experts in your field share their latest research and findings.

 

Earlier this month, the Alliance of International Aromatherapists brought together nearly 150 aromatherapists for their 2015 Conference and Expo. The 21 expert sessions covered topics such s aromatherapy myths, FDA regulations, aromatherapy in hospital settings, and much more. It was a fantastic assembling of the aromatic community.

 

If you didn’t make it, don’t stress! A few ACHS students (check out their video below!) and I made sure to write down our top takeaways from the expert sessions: Read more…

 

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Use of Essential Oils with Traditional Chinese Medicine http://www.alliance-aromatherapists.org/use-of-essential-oils-with-traditional-chinese-medicine/ Wed, 09 Sep 2015 11:57:21 +0000 http://www.alliance-aromatherapists.org/?p=6160 Continue reading ]]> fai-chan-2By Fai Chan (CMAIA) and Marc J. Gian, L. Ac, LMT

 

The use of essential oils based on Chinese medicine has proven to be an exceptional modality in gaining maximum results with clients.  This ancient healing system naturally adopts the use of essential oils.

 

This case study will give the reader an overview of how to work with the Spleen and Stomach (Earth Element).

 

Two of the major pathogenic factors in Chinese medicine are Damp and Cold. These influences cause stagnation of Qi. In short, when there is stagnant qi the energy does not flow properly and the body will experience signs and symptoms that mirror this.  

 

conf-gian

According to Chinese medicine a primary function of the Earth element (Spleen and Stomach) is to transform and transport postnatal qi.  Our postnatal qi is associated with diet, which includes what we absorb from our environment. (Gian 2015) (1)  TCM physiology states, that the Spleen ascends the pure postnatal qi and the stomach descends the impure. So, if the Qi is deficient the Spleen will not be able to do its proper job and this causes stagnation.  A cardinal sign of Spleen Qi Deficiency and Stagnation is flatulence.  This was the case with one of my clients, a 35 year old woman. Read more…

 

 

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When Ginger does not help —— http://www.alliance-aromatherapists.org/when-ginger-does-not-help/ Mon, 13 Apr 2015 22:16:54 +0000 http://www.alliance-aromatherapists.org/?p=5552 Continue reading ]]> The effect of Frankincense (Bowswellia frereana) in sobering and healing nauseachan-2

by Fai Chan, Aromatherapist

 

Ginger (Zingiber officinale) is renowned and widely praised for its ability to reduce motion sickness or nausea. There was a short period of time that I experienced nausea whenever someone gave me a ride. To help reduce the symptom, I usually brought Ginger essential oil mixed with jojoba oil to massage. I also put 1 drop of Ginger essential oil onto the tissue to inhale. However, I was not happy with the result.

 

To enhance the effect of Ginger essential oil, I made a salve with Ginger and Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) essential oils to massage when I was traveling. The blend had the following components:

0.25 oz Beeswax
1 oz Jojoba Wax
7 drops of Ginger
5 drops of Lavender

 

Together with the sedative or calming effect of Lavender on the central nervous system, the warm and spicy aroma of Ginger should be able to enhance the therapeutic properties in reducing motion sickness and nausea.  

 

When I first applied it, the smell is sweet and soothing that the salve improved the nausea but only temporarily. Repeated application did not help.

 

By chance I came across the oil named Frankincense (Boswellia frereana). I first encountered the oil when I attended a dinner, had some wine, and got half drunk.
After that dinner I applied Frankincense (Boswellia frereana) oil (1/4 tsp olive oil, 1 drop of essential oil) every 15 minutes twice on my forehead, temples, tip of the nose, area between the mouth and the nose, back of the neck, and shoulders; I also drank some hot green tea. I sobered up.

 

Thus, whenever I got motion sickness or nausea, I applied Frankincense [1/4 tsp olive oil, and 1 drop of essential oil] on the temples, back of the neck, and shoulders (apply several times or as necessary when needed). It worked great. The motion sickness or nausea went away after several applications and no longer bothered me.

 

Frankincense can also clear the mind and elevate the spirit. It keeps your spirit strong, focused, and positive. I used to take a nap after my breakfast, but as of today (Dec 15, 2014) I do not have to. Since I had back acne, and I was using frankincense to clear them with carrier oil. The whole process of application was rejuvenating. The inhalation of frankincense made me feel great and energetic about myself. As frankincense can achieve this objective, I suspect the application of it can relieve symptoms of mental illness. More research is needed to validate the claim.

 

The information or research about Boswellia frereana is very limited.  Known as the King of Frankincense, Boswellia frereana is usually imported from Somalia.  The therapeutic properties of Boswellia frereana are anti-inflammatory, uplifting, revitalizing, and centering.  It is also used for joint health. 

 

According to Stillpoint Aromatics (2014), Boswellia frereana is composed mainly of the chemistry of alpha thuyene, delta sabinene and para cymene – they are related to monoterpenes.  It also carries the characteristics of monoterpenes such as antiviral, antibacterial, analgesic, and so on.  Because of a high content of alpha thuyene, the aroma of Boswellia frereana is more pungent. 

 

People usually equate Boswellia frereana with Boswellia carterii.  From my experience, the latter is milder and more calming.  The invigorating effect of the former can make us stay awake all the night.

 

I think there are more benefits to Boswellia frereana.  More research is needed on its clinical application. 

 

References:

Boswellness. 2014. Retrieved from http://www.boswellness.com/sites/default/files/pdfs/Boswellness%20Frereana%20EO%20product%20sheet.pdf

Stillpoint Aromatics. 2014. Retrieved from http://www.stillpointaromatics.com/frankincense-frereana-Boswellia-frereana-essential-oil-aromatherapy?keyword=frankincense

Therapeutic properties mentioned above are from Aromahead Online Classes.

 

Bio: Bio: Fai Chan is the founder of Deli Aroma LLC. She received her certification from Academy Natural Health Sciences. She is now pursuing Advanced Graduate Certification online with Andrea Butje at Aromahead Institute. She is a Professional Member with NAHA and AIA. In addition, she has written articles for Lab Aroma, AIA, Aromatherapy Today (which will get published in the April edition), and Aromatherapy Thymes (which will get published in the Spring edition).
Email: deliaroma8@gmail.com

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Aroma-Qi Therapy – Teleseminar, December 17, 2014 http://www.alliance-aromatherapists.org/aroma-qi-therapy-teleseminar-december-17-2014/ Sun, 14 Dec 2014 16:03:34 +0000 http://www.alliance-aromatherapists.org/?p=5348 Continue reading ]]> AROMA-QI THERAPY: Ancient Chinese Five Element Energetics Expressed In Aromatic Blending

 

with Terese M. Miller DOM, CA, MFAterese-miller

 

Join Terese on the teleseminar to learn how Oriental Medicine can inform us in our energetic view of essential oils, it is important to have an overview of the two main theories that exist today in practice. Acupuncturists and Eastern Herbalists operate using either Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), Taoist Five Element Theory or a combination of both.

Tune in for a unique perspective on questions you may have about:

  • What are the main differences between TCM and Ancient Taoist Five Phase energetic theories?
  • What is the origin of The Heavenly Stems (five elements)?
  • Does each element contain correspondences to nature and the nature of the human body, mind and spirit?
  • Do we all have a unique constitutional element(s)?
  • What can I do if I am out of balance?
  • How do the five phases relate to specific essential oils?
  • What is Aroma-QI therapy?
  • Who can use this Aroma-Qi therapy?
  • What does Taoism have to do with it?

 

Learn More about teleseminars

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My First Blend, My Sickness, and My Fun http://www.alliance-aromatherapists.org/my-first-blend-my-sickness-and-my-fun/ Wed, 03 Dec 2014 18:34:02 +0000 http://www.alliance-aromatherapists.org/?p=5308 Continue reading ]]> fai-chanby Fai Chan, Aromatherapist

 

I keep a journal of the blends that I made on every occasion that involves aromatherapy. The case study is about the first blend that I made for myself in relieving my sickness. It turned out to be a great success. I discovered a protocol I keep using in healing.

 

November 17, 2013
I caught cold yesterday. I realized that my immune system was weak. When I felt the headache in the evening, I used tea tree oil to massage my head and I felt better.

 

When I woke up next morning, I could not do anything as my head ached and I had a mild fever. Therefore, I took a delicious breakfast with a glass of strawberry milk & some biscuits. I felt a lot better after a good meal. A delicious meal can help speed up the healing process.

 

Today, I take my first step to try blending. It’s really fun. It requires knowledge and creativity.

My blend is as follows:
1 drop of lavender (Lavandula angustifolia)
1 drop of geranium (Pelargonium roseum x asperum)
2 drops of ginger (Zingiber officinale)
1 tsp (5ml) of olive oil

 

It is relaxing, comforting, and stimulating. The hot ginger can help to expel the surface wind cold, while lavender and geranium calmed my heated organs. It smells great, not too intense. The mild fragrance is very well suited to those who are sick.

 

I then use the mixture to massage my chest, the back of the neck, my ears, my nose tip, the area between the nose and mouth, and abdominal area.

 

This blend works well to calm the menstrual pain or PMS too. After the applications, I took a cup of lemon with salt water. It is so soothing. I have never thought that being sick can be an enjoyment. If I was not sick, I do not know when I will have my first blend. This is my first product. This blend helps one to sleep well when one is sick.

 

November 18, 2013

I still experienced some spillover effect of the wind cold today. As the symptoms had almost gone, I blended another oil which is more fragrant. It was because I could take more fragrance now.

 

My blend is as follows:

1 drop of lavender (Lavandula angustifolia)
1 drop of Jasmine absolute (Jasminum grandiflorum)
1 drops of sandalwood (Santalum album )
3 drops of lemon (Citrus limon)
1tsp (5ml) of olive oil

 

I used the blend to massage back of the neck, shoulder, temples, nose tip, area between the nose and the mouth, my shoulders, chest and upper back area.

 

It is relaxing and astringent — it lessens the mucus. This blend is very relaxing and will cause drowsiness. After falling asleep, I feel much energetic now.

 

Conclusion: The two blends that I made were not targeting at healing my fever or cold, but making me more relaxing to fall asleep. When I am in deep sleep, my body can heal quickly. In my own philosophy, I prefer my body to do most of the work in the healing process, instead of relying on “outside help”. This experience reaffirms my belief on that, and it really works well. Although I ate things that were not 100% natural, the improvement in my mood helped me to recover in a speedy way.

 

Fai’s Bio:The owner of Deli Aroma LLC, Fai, got her clinical & esthetic aromatherapy certificates from Academy of Natural Health Sciences. She is now furthering her study with Aromahead Institute. She founded Deli Aroma in 2014, providing holistic approach to alleviate her clients’ aliments. She is a Professional Member with NAHA, and AIA.

Email: deliaroma8@gmail.com

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Teleseminar – July 16, 2014 http://www.alliance-aromatherapists.org/teleseminar-july-16-2014/ Wed, 16 Jul 2014 00:55:36 +0000 http://www.alliance-aromatherapists.org/?p=5008 Continue reading ]]> The Sensual Kitchen with Kris WredeKris_photo-#1-h

 

Kris Wrede has been cooking up a storm for way longer that she wants to share or that can she remember! She has culinary roots from her wonderful Mama & Grandma. Some of the stupendously yummy essential oil based recipes I will share in the teleseminar include Passion Sun Tea and Melon Ginger chilled soup. Tune in to hear all the secrets!

 

The use of plant and flower essences for therapy of mind and body and spirit were once considered the exclusive provenance of Egyptian Priests. Now you can unlock this ancient knowledge with Kris Wrede, Aromatic Alchemist and Natural Perfumer. Kris’s specialties include perfumery, skin care and essential oil cooking.

 

Her classroom approach stems from her extensive research into the mystical rituals of ancient cultures, her philosophy of perfume as medicine, and the miraculous healing energy apparent in the art of essential oil use. Her knowledge of essential oils is enhanced by a passion for their history. Allow Kris to share her wisdom with you, let her lead you through the aromatic world and imagine the possibilities it can play in your life. Learn more about teleseminars…

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Manuka Oil http://www.alliance-aromatherapists.org/manuka-oil/ Sat, 05 Jul 2014 14:18:29 +0000 http://www.alliance-aromatherapists.org/?p=4986 Continue reading ]]> by Austine McCarthy, RN

July 2014

mccarthy-7-14

Manuka is a very interesting member of the Myrtaceae family, Manuka Leptospermum scoparium. Coming from the same family are Australia’s Tea Tree (Melaleuca alternifolia), Fragonia (Agonia fragrans), Eucalyptus (Eucalyptus radiata and globulus) and Kunzea (Kunzea ambigua). Growing uncultivated on unfarmable land in New Zealand, it is thought that perhaps the stress of the growing conditions contribute to Manuka’s important attributes.

 

Essential oil of Manuka is steam distilled from the leaves and small stems that are gathered after the flowering season is complete. The flowering season is sacred because bees gather nectar to produce the valuable Manuka honey crop.

 

The essential oil has a yellowish/ brown color, a sharp, earthy odor. Probably not a fragrance that will make the best perfume for date night.

 

Much of the research is related to the benefits of the Manuka honey, most notably in the wound care arena. Medical grade honey is incorporated into dressings and topicals used to heal chronic wounds such as vascular and diabetic ulcers and decubitus ulcers (bed sores).  Read more… 

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