AIA Becomes “Contributing Producer” for Aromatherapy Documentary – Uncommon Scents

Uncommon Scents Thanks AIA

 

The world of aromatherapy is a complex one. There are everything from home users who use essential oils through oral traditions, people who self-study, and others that receive formal training to understand the chemical makeup and actions of essential oils. Aromatherapy pioneers such as Robert Tisserand, Sylla Shepherd-Hanger, Jeanne Rose, Colleen Dodt, and Marge Clark have been studying the art and science of aromatherapy for 30-40+ years. Millions are just beginning to study aromatherapy.

 

Social media sites such as Facebook, Pinterest, and Instagram have made the sharing of information about essential oils easier than ever. Aromatherapy pioneers generously contribute to the discussion and provide valuable insight.

 

While there is a vast amount of information about aromatherapy available online, it is not all reliable, and in many cases is misleading, incorrect, or dangerous. This range of information has set up a divide in the aromatherapy community and caused finger-pointing and leaves many scratching their heads to find a way to bring the aromatherapy community together to move forward united with a common goal of sharing sound information to make responsible aromatherapy available to as many as possible. Continue reading

Visiting the home of Fragonia™

by Priscilla Fouracres

 

I recently had the privilege of visiting the only place in the world where Fragonia™ (Agonis fragrans), is grown and produced into essential oil. The 46-hectare property (114 acres), owned and operated by John and Peta Day, is about two hours from Perth, the capital city of Western Australia.

John and Peta Day in a field of Agonis fragrans (Photo courtesy of the Paperbark Co.)

John and Peta Day in a field of Agonis fragrans (Photo courtesy of the Paperbark Co.)

 

The 'farm', as the Days call it, has a sense of serenity that emanates from the well-cared for and highly-loved piece of land they began developing 15 years ago.

 

A mud-map is required to find the farm and even then it is easy to drive past the unassuming property in a low-lying marshland where paperbark trees, a common name for some species of Melaleucas from the Myrtaceae family1, grow naturally. Continue reading

What is Aromatherapy?

Aromatherapy is a true holistic therapy, offering simultaneous healing possibilities on physical, emotional and energetic levels. Aromatherapy works by simply taking a deep breath: the aromatic molecules enter our blood stream and travel to all parts of our body. The wide range of aromas available can gently help any mood or emotion.

 

The essential oils used in aromatherapy are highly concentrated substances, extracted most commonly by steam distillation from a variety of flowers, herbs, trees, roots, and fruit. Each oil offers its own unique chemistry of healing qualities. Lavender, geranium, spruce, tea tree, eucalyptus, lemon and myrrh are oils commonly used in aromatherapy.

 

Each essential oil has its own distinct chemical profile that offers therapeutic properties. Each is classified as stimulating, balancing, relaxing, or more specifically, as antiviral, antibacterial, antifungal, decongestants, analgesics, antiinflammatory, digestives, to name a few.

 

A typical example is shown by the use of lavender, one of the most versatile and widely used oils. Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) is known to soothe tension headaches, reduce inflammation and pain, cleanse wounds,aid in tissue repair for burns and cuts, and relax you to sleep.

 

Today, aromatherapy is widely used in various health care settings: in hospitals for stress, nausea and cancer care; in senior care environments for reducing agitation, improving sleep, and improving indoor air quality; and in massage therapy for relaxation and reducing body pain.

 

To begin receiving the benefits of aromatherapy-find an aroma you love and enjoy all the gifts provided by nature's healing gifts.